Tag Archives: ereader

Old School vs. New School

timthumb.php“What more can I say? I wouldn’t be here today if the old school didn’t pave my way.”

Did you know that I can read without my glasses? I don’t do it often but it’s interesting when I do, because I have to have the book up pretty close to my face, and then I have this squint that is a thing of beauty. Generally I only do it when I’m in bed, when I either can’t reach my glasses or I’m dying to get straight to reading without worrying about locating them. Or even sometimes when I’m just trying to prove to my wife that I can read without them. She is never impressed.

It’s funny how when I use my Nook to read it’s so much easier to do it without using my glasses. That’s one thing I can definitely thank technology for. Because the screen is backlit the words seem to leap off the screen (I almost said page). I don’t even have to squint as long as the Nook is close enough to my face. It makes me look just that much cooler. At least I think so. That’s one point for reading through technology.

I find it interesting that one of the hottest debates these days among readers is the “old school” vs. “new school” argument. There is a legion of readers out there who scream SACRILEGE whenever anyone mentions reading on a device instead of opening an actual book and turning the antiqued pages. These readers use big words like TRADITION, and CONTINUITY, to prove their point while waving their large tomes in the air and waving them like they just don’t care. Bully for them.

Then there’s the complete other end of the spectrum, the people who only use devices to read anymore. You see them in the train station, at the dentist’s office, and sitting in their cars in a parking lot with the screen in front of them, be it an iPad, a Kindle Fire, a Nook HD, or any other tablet or smart phone out there. They are oftentimes so absorbed in the passages that you could wave a fire-soaked rag in front of their faces and they wouldn’t even blink. They love technology and technology loves them.

But where’s the middle ground? I know I’m firmly in that place instead of at the two extremes, and I could argue for both positions. I enjoy the flexibility of the new school, but the nostalgia of the old school. In fact, sometimes I read a book in both mediums just so I can say I did. So, what are the advantages of each? I’m glad you asked.

Pros of keeping it “old school”:

  • The smell. There’s just something about that smell of paper in the morning.
  • The physicality. Being able to flip the pages is totally underrated.
  • The bookmark. Bookmarks have their own history that electronic ones can’t match.
  • Used books. I can pick up a book for 25 cents at a book sale, or utilize something called a library.
  • The book store. Just hanging out touching books is fun.

Pros of going “new school”:

  • The variety. You can fit so many books on one device it’s almost scary.
  • The portability. Imagine you’re going on a long trip and want several books to read. One device.
  • The back-light. Oh yeah, what helps me to read without my glasses. Or in bed while my wife is asleep. Shhh.
  • Internet-ready. I love using the built-in dictionary to define odd words I had never met before.
  • e(nvironment)-friendly. Save some trees, right?

Of course that’s just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to positions for each format, and there are a host of negatives associated with both as well. It’s one of the huge reasons I utilize both and I don’t feel bad for it. Which one do you feel is the best way to go, or are you like me and take advantage of both choices? That’s not even starting on audio books, which are even more interesting to discuss, depending on who’s doing the talking. Get it, doing the talking? Audio books?

Never mind.

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Filed under Books, Reading, Technology